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gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
is that? tom foreman is in washington to speculate. good morning. >> reporter: hi, carroll. we don't know what that means. there's been speculation it will have something to do with mental health issues because certainly at a lot of local levels people talked about that on the republican side. people on the conservative side saying that has to be addressed as much, perhaps more than the gun issue itself. so we're expecting that may be the direction to go but the truth is we don't really know. what we do know is that the nra was quiet immediately after this. they often are after such incidents and they usually say as they did this time out of respect for the community and the family involved but now that a little bit of time has passed what we would certainly expect here is that there would be a clear message to the white house and to others which is be careful about overreacting at this point because the nra will push back and certainly they have proven that politically they have the power to do it not only nationally but certainly at the state level. carol? >> tom foreman reporting live
: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin of greed. that is what i think caused it. for myself, naca program helped us, taking us out of the ugly arm. my mortgage is $964 a month, which will allow us to stay in our home comfortably. guest: people blame things like a financial crisis on greed, but greed is not changing. it has been with us for hundreds of thousands of years. people are greedy naturally. if we design institutions assuming people are altruistic, we will get hurt. we have to assume they are greedy, and if there altruistic, we will only benefit from that. we assume that people want to live in their own home, and give people a choice, buying or rentin
diplomacy in the years ahead. >> reporter: wolf, with his 30 years in washington and kerry's comfort with the ways of the senate, john kerry might not be a natural partner for the president but the two men have come to respect one another, especially when the president has dispatched him to work on issues in pakistan and afghanistan and sudan. but especially as they joufted with each other during debate prep for many hours in the nevada desert and at camp david, wolf. >> stand by after you hear from the president, right at the top of the hour, 5:00 p.m. eastern, he'll be in the white house briefing room to make a statement on the fiscal cliff. you'll be there as well. thank you, jessica. >>> john kerry's nomination taps what has been a tumultuous time for the white house to find a secretary of state. a look now at the senior senator from massachusetts. >> reporter: many regarded as the worst-kept secret in washington, even in recent senate hearings, john kerry already sounded like he was looking ahead to his future job and the anticipated budget problems with congress. >> that must c
, who were in washington. .. >> what they had was not enough. either in benghazi or the overwhelming numbers. frankly, the state department had not given security for personal resources it needed. on that note, let me ask admiral mullen in regards to the specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador, i appreciate that. i do appreciate your leadership throughout this process as well. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks on benghazi were security related. responsibility for the loss of life committee injuries, and damage to u.s. facilities rest completely and solely with the terrorists who conducted the attacks. that does not mean that there are lessons to be learned. the board found that the security posture at the special mission compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. state department bureau that was supporting benghazi had not taken on security is a shared responsibility. so that support the proposed needed was often lacking and let to the working level to res
in particular caused washington to give unusual deference to his judgment. while the report concludes that there were systemic failures at senior levels of the state department, significantly it does not make any formal recommendations for discipline airy action, bill. bill: what else should we know that's in there, catherine? >> reporter: well the missing piece really, and this is the critical policy piece, is why it was that the obama administration specifically, the secretary of state, advocated for this light footprint on the ground in benghazi when the intelligence seemed to suggest otherwise? secretary clinton will not be testifying this week citing doctors orders she remain at home as she recovers from this concussion. instead we'll hear from two of her deputies. >> when you hear the testimony of deputy secretary burns and deputy secretary nines remind they are standing in for her, so the testimony they give on thursday will very much reflect her view and how we should two forward from this report and how we should learn its lesson. >> reporter: two main takeaways here that sec
to reach a tax-and-spending deal in washington. the president just spoke at length about negotiations and we'll get to that in a moment. but earlier we heard a stern warning for uncle sam, meaning all of us, from one of the world's leading credit rating agencies. fix the fiscal crisis or risk a downgrade. fitch warning again that it may strip the united states of its aaa credit rating if washington is unable to strike a deal to avert these big tax hikes and spending cuts that we're going to see at the end of this year and also to allow borrowing to rise. now this is not the first time we've heard of these warnings or have seen america's credit take a hit. in 2011, standard & poor's cut its u.s. rating to double a from aaa blaming political brinkmanship for preventing on a agreement on raising the debt ceiling. we heard the president talk about the standoff in debt negotiations, a deal our stuart varney said is raising red flags. here is what he had to say earlier on his show. >> right after the election the boss of big labor, richard trumka led a delegation of leftists into the white
cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak ridge boys bush. special number tribute for number 41. "fox & friends" begins right now. >> am i wrong about that don't the have a deep voice? ♪ >> oak ridge boys have been on this show many times on "fox & friends." >> good morning, everyone. >> dave: good morning. juliet huddy celebrating an early new year's eve. is it new year's eve? >> juliet: sparkly shoes and everything. i feel like we are waking up at 4:00 in the morning on saturday i better be festive. >> clayton: that's what woke me up this morning. >> juliet: this is a beautiful set it has inspired me. >> dave: it's spectacular. >> juliet: it is. >> dave: it's fiscal cliff time. couple of days away. rare i wake up and say i'm moderately optimistic but that's what the president said. you are either optimistic or you are not. the president said he is modestly optimistic a
a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her heart, she is leading the charge. this is a bittersweet day. i think it is so important on days like this and every day, that we listen to our children. savor their innocence and applaud their unquencha
in the whole vietnam war. so let's get to cnbc's washington correspondent john harwood to talk about how washington will handle the gun control issue. i guess that's what we'll talk about this time. we have a lot to talk to you about involving washington. i guess the lead, obviously, we would be talking about boehner, too, at some point, john. do you have comments on the gun control issue? >> well, i think you saw in the president's address last night, a politician who had been deeply impacted by what happened, like the entire country has been impacted. and i think it is changing the calculus, the way he looks at political risk on this issue. democrats, as you know, joe, for some time has shied away from pushing gun control out of the believe that it is a loser for them politically. republicans have done well when democrats tried to push the gun control bill. there is a broad swath of public opinion that favors things like bans on assault weapons and high volume magazine clips for weapons. i think the president is saying -- when he said on friday, even, before the speech last evening, he
time. that does it for today's "washington journal." will be back tomorrow. the live coverage of the house of representatives live on c- span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 18, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable nan s. hayworth to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other t
carolina. his 2009 "abigail adams" won the bancroft prize. holten is a finalist for the george washington book prize and national book award. his first book, "forced founders: indians, debtors, slaves and the making of the american revolution in virginia," won the organization of american historians 'mel kurdy award. i'm honor today introduce -- honored to introduce woody holten. [applause] >> first, i want to celebrate the wisdom ask and the congeniality of the fellow judges who gave up a half year of tear own writing to -- of their own writing to help find the fife amazing books that we present to you tonight. they are brad gooch, linda gordon, susan orlene and judith -- [inaudible] [applause] the other judges and i also want to give special thanks to sherry young who was our tireless and perfectionist liaison at the national book foundation. thank you, sherry. [applause] the finalists for the 2012 national book award for nonfiction are anne applebaum, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1845-1856" published by doubleday. and katherine boo, behind the beautiful forevers. [app
colleague from washington, mr. reichert, who knows firsthand the power of d.n.a. evidence from his years as a sheriff. and finally and most importantly, katie's family and her mother. she has endured every parent's worst nightmare. her determination and dedication are inspiring and when katie's law is signed into law, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. kati
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
the department of defense, they'll have 1600 of the collectors according to the washington post, there are already around 500 case officers at the defense intelligence agency. gathers tension for the military by 2018. they'll have about a thousand and that number will keep growing as the defense intelligence agency transitions over to the new dcs spies will be trained by the cia, but unlike the cia, the dcs is not going to be able to do anything, but gath gather intelligence, political sabotage and drone strikes continue to be cia operations and of dcs, focus on i.d.ing targets. and in recent months, those priorities have been keeping tabs on problem areas like africa, iran, north korea and even the strengthening military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon panetta who used to be a cia chief and by general david petraeus who stepped down as cia chief after an extramarital affair was exposed last month, as for funding, the pentagon gave the dcs about 100 million dollars just to get the program started, but their overall budget is not expected to grow.
. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> i rise to recognize the outstanding service of jay johnson of the department of defense in navigating a wide range of important legal issues, he's been an invaluable partner to the house aarped services committee. over the last four years he advised the committee on numerous national security challenges including cyberwarfare, counterterrorism operation the legal boundaries in the conflict against al qaeda, and detainee operations worldwide. he was integral tour efforts to reform military commissions for those -- with those accused of planning and executing the 9/11 attacks will be tried. he's created briefings on don't ask, don't tell, efforts to combat sexual assault in the military, changes to the combat exclusion policy, the member of the joint chiefs staff and the withdrawal of troops from iraq. there's been no shortage of difficult and controversial issues. he's always approached them intell
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20

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